Category Archives: Chemistry

Isabella Karle

Isabella Karle in 2005 in Washington, DC Isabella Karle (1921- ) is a world-famous structural chemist, who has received almost all awards and distinctions except for the Nobel Prize. In fact, there are many who thought she should have shared … Continue reading

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Stephanie L. Kwolek

Image from the Hagley Vault Digital Archives.  Caption says “Stephanie L. Kwolek, developer of Kevlar (circa 1995).  While working with DuPont Stephanie Kwolek developed the first liquid crystal polymer which provided the basis for Kevlar brand fiber.”  The New York … Continue reading

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Sandra Kizior

Thanks to Sandy Kizior, who shared several photographs from her working life.  I smile every time I read this comment she left on the blog: Rachel I love you. Finally a “place” online I can feel like one of the … Continue reading

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Ursula Franklin

Thanks to Deb Hirsch, who pointed out this article in the Atlantic about Ursula Franklin.  According to the article, The 92-year-old metallurgist pioneered the field of archeometry, the science of dating archaeologically discovered bronzes, metals, and ceramics. Her research into spiking … Continue reading

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Mary Petty

Thanks to Deb Hirsch who shared this terrific picture from the UNC-G Archives of Mary Petty, who led the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Chemistry Dept from 1893 to 1934. Here’s a bit more info from Erin Lawrimore: As … Continue reading

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Ruth Benerito

Thanks to Andrea Hermann, who suggested this post: The Washington Post recently had an obituary by Emily Langer for Dr. Ruth Benerito.  Dr. Benerito, an Agriculture Department chemist, was credited with helping create wrinkle-free cotton.  She died Oct. 5 at age 97. … Continue reading

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GGSTEM Challenge: Who was Margaret Dorothy Foster?

Here’s the next #GGSTEM challenge:  Let’s write a post together about Margaret Foster.  Thanks to @CCdiglib, I saw the above image in a review on the BrainPickings blog of the book  The Science Education of American Girls: A Historical Perspective (Studies in the History … Continue reading

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