Hertha Marks Ayrton

Hertha Marks Ayrton’s 162nd birthday

Thank you to Mathematician Sharon Lubkin, who called my attention to the Google doodle above, which was posted in honor of what would be Hertha Marks Ayrton’s 162nd birthday.   This led me to a fun jaunt through her Wikipedia page – all of which was new to me.  Check it out!

According to this page, you can read more here:

Appleyard, Rollo. The History of the Institution of Electrical Engineers. London: 1939; Ayrton, Hertha.

The Electric Arc. London: 1902; Crawford, Elizabeth. The Women’s Suffrage Movement: A Reference Guide 1866-1928.London: 1999;

Girton College Register, 1869-1946;

Hirsch, Pam.Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon: feminist, artist and rebel. London:1998; Mason, Joan.

“Hertha Ayrton and the Admission of Women to the Royal Society of London,” Notes and Records of the Royal Society. London: 1991;

Sharp, Evelyn.Hertha Ayrton: A Memoir. London: 1926.

 

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Thelma Prince

Thanks to librarian Allegra Swift, who passed along this tweet

ThelmaPrince

pointing to this article about Thelma Prince, who contributed to the development of the polio vaccine.

 

 

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Sylvia Miller

Sylvia Miller in 1973 and today

Thank you to Kathy Kobayashi, who forwarded this LA Times article featuring a new book about the women who worked as programmers at JPL by Nathalia Holt, “Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars.”  See the article for a recent interview with Sylvia Miller.

The picture above, from the LA Times Article is captioned “Sylvia Miller, pictured on the left in 1973, was one of the last human computers hired by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1968. She is now one of the female subjects in a newly released book by Nathalia Holt titled “Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars.” Miller went on to have a 40-year career at JPL and retired in 2008. (Left: Courtesy of Jet Propulsion Laboratory / Right: Tim Berger / Staff Photographer)”

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Lucy Jones

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Image of Jones in the LA Times Article credited to KNBC.

Thanks to physicist Karen Daniels, who pointed out this LA Times article about the retirement of U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Jones.  The article notes that  “She’s retiring from the USGS this month to help officials develop science-based policies related to climate change, tsunamis and other kinds of natural disasters.”

The article discusses her interesting educational history and career, which included an undergraduate degree in Chinese language and literature that led to her becoming the first American scientist to enter China in 1979 to study earthquakes.

 

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Stephanie Shirley

Stephanie Shirley .png

Thank you to Lauren Buchsbaum, who pointed out this NPR Ted Radio hour piece on Dame Stephanie Shirley, a Kindertransport survivor who made it big in the tech business (pre-Mac and pc) and created a company for women to work and achieve while raising an autistic child.

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Mary Anning

Mary_Anning-1043x700

Thanks to Allegra Swift for the suggestion of this JSTOR Daily article about forgotten female fossilists!

 

 

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Ellen Williams

Ellen Williams_Headshot.jpg

Thanks to Sam Kome, who pointed out this article on innovation in battery technology.  The effort is led by Dr. Ellen Williams, director of ARPA-E.

Here’s a release from Reuters:   A wing of the U.S. Department of Energy focused on breakthrough technologies may soon give billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk’s most recent foray into energy storage a run for its money, the unit’s director said.

Read more in an article in The Guardian and another in venturebeat.com.

 

 

 

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